The Covid-19 Conundrum | Golden Rules Gal

Category: Public Health Etiquette

Produce bag doubles as a wipe for a shopping cart

Tips on How to Thrive and Survive 

We may be living six feet apart, but we’re still in this together.  While spatial distancing is now as common as brushing your teeth, space sharing takes a close second.  With schools closed and many parents working from home, families (and roommates) are having to live in close quarters, which can be a challenge. 

With shelters in place nationwide, here are some tips on not how to thrive and survive:

  • Avoid close contact. With people as well as touching your face, eyes or, mouth.
  • Disinfect.  Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces and items in your home (counters; phones; door handles; clickers; light switches; toilet handles).
  • Doctor’s Office Visit.  If you have to go to the doctor, wear a mask and gloves.  Likewise, if you are sick, keep your distance from others.
  • Outdoor Exercise.  Keep a spatial distance.  If you see crowds, avoid them like a plague.  Wash your hands if you touch anything.
  • Preparing Foods.  Always wash your hands before touching any food, and wear disposable gloves to be extra safe.
  • Protect your loved ones.  Discourage children and teen gatherings.  Gather at home instead for movie night, or encourage face time.
  • Pumping Gas.  You might have clean hands, but think how many people before you touched the handle?  Wear gloves or handle the pump with a wipe.
  • Riding Sharing Bikes. Bike rentals are a terrific way to get exercise while maintaining distance.  However, the key word is shared. It’s a good idea to wear gloves and put any personal items in a bag before placing in the basket.
  • Shopping.  If using a shopping cart, wear gloves or wipes to clean the handle before touching it.  If they’re not available, use a produce bag.
  • Steering Wheel.  If you’re sharing a car, disinfect every time you park.  A steering wheel has more bacteria than a public toilet seat!  

Research shows the sooner you implement a new behavior, the better your chances are of making it permanent.  It only takes 100 days for the pattern to become automatic. Every one of us has the power and potential to change.  It’s like riding a bike: the recall will be automatic once you make it a habit. Sending a virtual hug from my home to yours. Stay safe! 

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